July 23, 2014
ucsdhealthsciences:

A Moveable Yeast: modeling shows proteins never sit still
Our body’s proteins – encoded by DNA to do the hard work of building and operating our bodies – are forever on the move. Literally, according to new findings reported by Trey Ideker, PhD, chief of the Division of Genetics in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Hemoglobin protein molecules, for example, continuously transit through our blood vessels while other proteins you’ve never heard of bustle about inside cells as they grow, develop, respond to stimuli and succumb to disease.
To better understand the role of proteins in biological systems, Ideker and colleagues developed a computer model that can predict a protein’s intracellular wanderings in response to a variety of stress conditions.
To date, the model has been used to predict the effects of 18 different DNA-damaging stress conditions on the sub-cellular locations and molecular functions of more than 5,800 proteins produced by yeasts. They found, for example, that yeast proteins could move from mitochondria to the cell nucleus and from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus.
Though the model debut involved yeasts, researchers said the coding can be adapted to study changes in protein locations for any biological system in which gene expression sequences have been identified, including stem cell differentiation and drug response in humans.
Image courtesy of Material Mavens

ucsdhealthsciences:

A Moveable Yeast: modeling shows proteins never sit still

Our body’s proteins – encoded by DNA to do the hard work of building and operating our bodies – are forever on the move. Literally, according to new findings reported by Trey Ideker, PhD, chief of the Division of Genetics in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hemoglobin protein molecules, for example, continuously transit through our blood vessels while other proteins you’ve never heard of bustle about inside cells as they grow, develop, respond to stimuli and succumb to disease.

To better understand the role of proteins in biological systems, Ideker and colleagues developed a computer model that can predict a protein’s intracellular wanderings in response to a variety of stress conditions.

To date, the model has been used to predict the effects of 18 different DNA-damaging stress conditions on the sub-cellular locations and molecular functions of more than 5,800 proteins produced by yeasts. They found, for example, that yeast proteins could move from mitochondria to the cell nucleus and from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus.

Though the model debut involved yeasts, researchers said the coding can be adapted to study changes in protein locations for any biological system in which gene expression sequences have been identified, including stem cell differentiation and drug response in humans.

Image courtesy of Material Mavens

July 22, 2014
medicaljourney:

Med school prep - books every pre-med student should read
(Taken with instagram)
Book list:
Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Dr. Atul Gawande
The Mindful Medical Student by Dr. Jeremy Spiegel
Informed Consent: The U.S. Medical Education System Explained by Dr. Benjamin J. Brown
The Medical School Interview by Dr. Jeremiah Fleenor
Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience by  Dr. Robert H. Miller and Dr. Dan Bissell
The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook by Dr. Suzanne M. Miller
Becoming a Physician: A Practical and Creative Guide to Planning a Career in Medicine by Dr. Jennifer Danek and Dr. Marita Danek
On Call: A Doctor’s Days and Nights in Residency by Dr. Emily Transue
Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years by Dr. Michael J. Collins
Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis by Dr. Lisa Sanders
Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland

medicaljourney:

Med school prep - books every pre-med student should read

(Taken with instagram)

Book list:

Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Dr. Atul Gawande

The Mindful Medical Student by Dr. Jeremy Spiegel

Informed Consent: The U.S. Medical Education System Explained by Dr. Benjamin J. Brown

The Medical School Interview by Dr. Jeremiah Fleenor

Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience by Dr. Robert H. Miller and Dr. Dan Bissell

The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook by Dr. Suzanne M. Miller

Becoming a Physician: A Practical and Creative Guide to Planning a Career in Medicine by Dr. Jennifer Danek and Dr. Marita Danek

On Call: A Doctor’s Days and Nights in Residency by Dr. Emily Transue

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years by Dr. Michael J. Collins

Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis by Dr. Lisa Sanders

Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland

July 20, 2014
compoundchem:

An update to the previous graphic on organic functional groups today, with some additions and refinements to make it a little clearer.
As always, you can download the PDF on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3c

compoundchem:

An update to the previous graphic on organic functional groups today, with some additions and refinements to make it a little clearer.

As always, you can download the PDF on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3c

July 18, 2014
compoundchem:

Today’s graphic looks at the compounds behind the characteristic smell of the seaside.
Read more about where these compounds come from here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-nf

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic looks at the compounds behind the characteristic smell of the seaside.

Read more about where these compounds come from here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-nf

2:30pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZANPsn1LrP0AJ
  
Filed under: chemistry sea algae 
July 17, 2014

the-science-llama:

Fluorescein

This chemical is a fluorophorecontaining many aromatic groups and having the ability to absorb light and re-emit a new photon (fluorescence). There are other types of fluorescence that allow re-emission of light at higher energies or even the same energy but in this case the re-emitted light is at a lower energy. Because it is under a UV light, it absorbs the UV and the light that it re-emits will be visible to human eyes. Sadly, what we can see is only a very narrow band of the spectrum, still pretty awesome!

(via lunaticstar)

July 6, 2014
compoundchem:

It’s been a little while since the last entry in the ‘Everyday Compounds’ series; today’s entry looks at sodium hypochlorite, found in household bleach, and used to chlorinate swimming pools.
The accompanying article also details why, aside from the obvious reasons, getting three million people to urinate in a swimming pool would be a bad idea: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ml

compoundchem:

It’s been a little while since the last entry in the ‘Everyday Compounds’ series; today’s entry looks at sodium hypochlorite, found in household bleach, and used to chlorinate swimming pools.

The accompanying article also details why, aside from the obvious reasons, getting three million people to urinate in a swimming pool would be a bad idea: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ml

4:04pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZANPsn1KkLjyw
  
Filed under: chemistry 
June 29, 2014
compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

June 26, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

Tomorrow (Saturday) is the birthday of Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev - the man whose ground-breaking work led to the creation of the modern periodic table of elements.

Here’s a fun look at his contributions from Lou Serico and TED-Ed:

I Mende-love that guy. Thanks for the table, D!

(via hawkelahawke)

4:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZANPsn1JptJKZ
  
Filed under: chemistry 
June 13, 2014

ladykaymd:

aspiringdoctors:

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

NEAT

Pretty cool graphic but it does perpetuate an incorrect idea that language is a mono-hemispheric process.

Actually language is really a global process. While most people’s “language centers” with the most activity are on the left side, you activate multiple areas of the brain to understand and produce language.

For example, you activate your occipital cortex when speaking or listening because you’re visualizing what you’re saying or hearing.

Language is a global process. It requires the parts of your brain that are regimented and orderly, the parts that are creative, the parts that are for seeing and hearing and moving and feeling.

That’s why language is awesome. :)

#CogSciMajorOut

June 4, 2014

(Source: likeaphysicist, via bacchea)

9:32pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZANPsn1HqIo_6
  
Filed under: science