September 18, 2014
i luv these ppl when i die say any of these artists’ names and i will live

i luv these ppl when i die say any of these artists’ names and i will live

September 18, 2014
compoundchem:

An update to the previous graphic on organic functional groups today, with some additions and refinements to make it a little clearer.
As always, you can download the PDF on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3c

compoundchem:

An update to the previous graphic on organic functional groups today, with some additions and refinements to make it a little clearer.

As always, you can download the PDF on the site: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-3c

(via )

9:07am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLIeSm1R6IVYL
  
Filed under: chemistry ochem 
September 18, 2014
compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

(via )

9:06am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLIeSm1R6IEIR
  
Filed under: chemistry 
September 18, 2014

ladykaymd:

aspiringdoctors:

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

NEAT

Pretty cool graphic but it does perpetuate an incorrect idea that language is a mono-hemispheric process.

Actually language is really a global process. While most people’s “language centers” with the most activity are on the left side, you activate multiple areas of the brain to understand and produce language.

For example, you activate your occipital cortex when speaking or listening because you’re visualizing what you’re saying or hearing.

Language is a global process. It requires the parts of your brain that are regimented and orderly, the parts that are creative, the parts that are for seeing and hearing and moving and feeling.

That’s why language is awesome. :)

#CogSciMajorOut

(via )

September 18, 2014

(Source: likeaphysicist, via )

September 18, 2014

compoundchem:

Ion test/colour graphics are proving popular on the site in the run up to exams! You can download this set from the link on the page here.

(via )

9:04am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLIeSm1R6HugN
  
Filed under: science chemistry 
September 18, 2014

compoundchem:

Here’s part 2 of the chemical reactions posters, featuring condensation, hydrolysis, displacement, oxidation and reduction - again, print versions are available to download right here.

(via )

9:04am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLIeSm1R6HtIA
  
Filed under: science chemistry 
September 18, 2014

compoundchem:

Over the past week, I got asked by Sense About Science, a UK-based charitable organisation dedicated to preventing scientific misinformation, to make some graphics for their new, free guide, “Making Sense of Chemical Stories”. In it, they attempt to dispel some of the common misconceptions about chemicals. These are the two graphics I made to support the guide’s content.

You can read more about the graphics here.

You can view & download Sense About Science’s excellent guide right here.

(via )

September 18, 2014

miseriathome said: Why does HF bypass the skin and dissolve bone, unlike other strong acids?

compoundchem:

The reason HF is capable of penetrating the skin and tissue so well stems from fluorine’s high electronegativity. Electronegativity is the measure of an atom’s ability to attract electrons towards itself, a property that varies from element to element, as shown in the table below.

image

(You can view the rest of the graphic this image is pulled from here)

Most acids dissociate to varying degrees in solution, meaning that they break up into their component positive and negative ions. Strong acids dissociate more than weak acids. Hydrofluoric acid is a weak acid; because of fluorine’s high electronegativity, the fluoride ion ‘clings’ to the hydrogen ion, making it difficult for HF to dissociate into ions.

Acids usually react with skin due to the dissociation of hydrogen ions, which are then free to react with proteins in tissue. Since HF doesn’t dissociate much at all, it can diffuse further into the tissue before it does eventually dissociate, and the fluoride ion can then go on to react with calcium in the bones.

You can read more detail on this here.

9:03am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLIeSm1R6Hjnf
  
Filed under: science chemistry 
September 18, 2014

compoundchem:

A bit of a detour into neuroscience today with a look at the chemical structures of some of the major neurotransmitters in the brain. Inspired in part by this post on the chemicals related to various emotions.

All available to download as free A3 PDFs at the bottom of the accompanying post (http://wp.me/p4aPLT-6C).

(via )

9:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZLIeSm1R6Grtr
  
Filed under: chemistry science